Emotionally Strong People

I recently picked up John C. Maxwell’s new book, No Limits. I’ve been reading it for the past couple of days. Here’s an excerpt from his chapter entitled “Emotional Capacity.”

“Emotional capacity is the ability to handle adversity, failure, criticism, change, and pressure in a positive way…However, emotionally strong people are able to manage their emotions and process through difficulties. That allows them to increase their capacity and moves them closer to reaching their full potential.”

“Emotionally strong people do not expect immediate results. As they approach life, they know they are in it for the long haul. As they face struggles, they do so with energy and fortitude. They understand that genuine success takes time. They try new things and fail. They run into obstacles but persevere. They keep going, keep working. They focus on the right decisions they need to make, and make them quickly. They realize that they may change their direction overnight, but they won’t arrive at their destination overnight. They keep their eye on the big picture, and they don’t quit.”

“Controlling what you can and not wasting energy on what you can’t is one of the most important lessons we can learn in life.”

“One mark of resilience is learning to tell which pain deserves our attention paying attention to every pain, all the time, doesn’t lead to resilience. It usually leads to whining.”

#JMT 

#JohnMaxwell 

#nolimits

#potential

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Gritty 

“Grit is having the strength and the resilience to overcome your obstacles to reach your goals. To be gritty, you have to care more about succeeding than your possible failures. It forces you to dig deep in your pain and believe you’re going to accomplish your goals.”

Rodney & Ron Lewis, Gritty.

 

Book #3

As I shared earlier, one of my  goals this year is to read 12 books. I am actually on book #3 now. This book, Gritty, is co-written by a friend of mine, Ron Lewis. 

Take the time to find out more about these brothers and their passion the following link. Order the book. By their book and give it to a first year college student. They will thank you for it.

http://www.lewflu.com

Response Ability

On my way into work this morning, I was listening to John Lee Dumas’ podcast, “Entrepreneur on Fire”.  In the episode I listened to (#1482 from November 11, 2016), John was interviewing Rob Moore, author of Disruptive Entrepreneur.  I would highly recommend taking time to listen to EOFire.  Whether you are striving to become an entrepreneur or not, you will learn valuable insights into yourself, your work, and your world.

During an interaction, Rob pointed out that John had emphasized the word “responsibility” as “response ability”.  They had a great exchange following that.  For obvious reasons.

This past Friday, my company held its 3rd annual all-employee education day.  It was a great time to learn, collaborate, and stretch.  But now it’s Monday morning.  What are we all doing with all that information we were exposed to?

Studies show that probably only 5% of us will actually act on new insights we’ve been exposed to. That’s it!  Only 5%!

But dove-tailing off of EOFire this morning, you have the “response ability” to do more with what you learn.

  • You read an article that directly applies to your line of work.  Take time to share it with someone on your team.  Find out if your work should change based upon new ideas you discovered.
  • You read a book about personal growth.  Create an action plan to put what you’ve learned into practice.  Today.
  • You attended a seminar that got you all pumped up.  Journal about what you learned, how you felt, and what you intend to do about this new insight.

In other words, when you learn something new, TAKE ACTION!  That’s your response ability.  As Jeff Olson in The Slight Edge says, take daily, disciplined action toward your goals and you will succeed.

Are you taking responsibility?  Make a plan.  Do the plan.  Don’t let great insight and experience go to waste.

make things happen

 

Get to “Yes” by Tony Jeary

Another great article by Tony Jeary.  

To merit a spot on your prospects’ calendars, you need a pitch that holds the promise of monetary returns for them.

Do your homework.

If you are going to book first visits, you need to sound like someone who has the business acumen, experience and ideas that can make a difference in your prospective client’s business—in other words, a compelling value proposition for your sales call.

This means doing your due diligence before you make that phone call or write that email. You need to know what the three or four major issues your prospective customer is likely to be dealing with—or will be soon.

Instead of introducing yourself and your services, your prospecting pitch needs to be built on your ideas about the root causes of your prospects’ challenges and how they can think about them, hopefully leading them toward a groundbreaking solution. It sounds like this: “Hi, Mary, this is Anthony with XYZ Inc. My company helps people deal with the challenges of low productivity, high consumable costs and employee dissatisfaction. I am calling to ask you for 20 minutes to share the three biggest trends impacting your business and give you some ideas that help our clients produce better results at lower costs. Could we meet for 20 minutes on Thursday? I’ll share these ideas with you, and even if you never buy from me, they will help you and your team.”

This pitch doesn’t suggest that I will talk about my company or myself. It doesn’t indicate that I am going to try to make a personal connection; instead it says I am going to help the prospect think about her business and its problems. You have to focus on helping your prospects with their biggest challenges, those same challenges you discovered when doing your research.

Pitch to the correct contact.

For decades salespeople were told to start as high up in the organization as possible and then let the C-level executive introduce them to his or her team. This used to be wise advice, but now folks in the C suites wantconsensus about solutions before they weigh in, and if the salesperson hasn’t been vetted by their teams, the executives aren’t likely to push their solution onto lower-level workers.

Today there’s a new contact to target with your prospecting: the CEO of the Problem. The CEO of the Problem is the person who must achieve results in dealing with the issues that you can resolve. The contacts who fit this role will also be the people who are the most susceptible to your message because they’re the ones struggling to produce results. You can help them, and they will meet with you, provided you’ve convincingly conveyed your ability to help when you reach out with your prospecting call, voice mail or email.

(Note that the CEO of the Problem may have a C-level title. But the larger your prospective client company, the less likely that your vital contacts rank this highly.)

Nurture your prospects.


Read the entire article  here:  http://www.success.com/article/how-to-get-a-yes-to-your-next-sales-pitch