Leadership, Vision, and Grace by Jim Johnson

As I wrote earlier, one of my leaders invited me to lunch with Mayor Tom Henry of my hometown, Fort Wayne, Indiana.  We just returned from this private luncheon.

mayor henry

Mayor Henry is a genuine leader with a gracious spirit and a keen vision for our city.  His strategic plan for growth has seen our downtown begin to be revitalized.  Our city is experiencing growth in new businesses which creates jobs.  His plans have created wonderful family attractions.  His plans for the future will do even more of this.  He openly shared his vision for more growth and expansion – and exciting days are ahead for Fort Wayne.

At the end of our meeting, we gave him our gifts and he also shared gifts with us.  He was honestly thrilled to receive the books.  We were honored by his gifts.

Mayor Henry’s family has been a part of our city’s history for over 100 years now.  You can easily perceive his passion for Fort Wayne.  While the Mayor is no longer a young man, he was energized when talking about the future.  Investors are seeking Fort Wayne out – great things are in store for us!

Our Mayor is a busy man. He is the leader of the 2nd largest city in the state of Indiana.  But he took the time today to have a relaxed lunch with the two of us.  There were no politics at play.  No trying to sell us something.  He genuinely loves what he does and loves to hear how his vision has positively impacted our city.

Leadership.  Vision.  Grace.

May we all embody those attributes as we seek to influence others to success.

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Emotionally Strong People

I recently picked up John C. Maxwell’s new book, No Limits. I’ve been reading it for the past couple of days. Here’s an excerpt from his chapter entitled “Emotional Capacity.”

“Emotional capacity is the ability to handle adversity, failure, criticism, change, and pressure in a positive way…However, emotionally strong people are able to manage their emotions and process through difficulties. That allows them to increase their capacity and moves them closer to reaching their full potential.”

“Emotionally strong people do not expect immediate results. As they approach life, they know they are in it for the long haul. As they face struggles, they do so with energy and fortitude. They understand that genuine success takes time. They try new things and fail. They run into obstacles but persevere. They keep going, keep working. They focus on the right decisions they need to make, and make them quickly. They realize that they may change their direction overnight, but they won’t arrive at their destination overnight. They keep their eye on the big picture, and they don’t quit.”

“Controlling what you can and not wasting energy on what you can’t is one of the most important lessons we can learn in life.”

“One mark of resilience is learning to tell which pain deserves our attention paying attention to every pain, all the time, doesn’t lead to resilience. It usually leads to whining.”

#JMT 

#JohnMaxwell 

#nolimits

#potential

Gritty 

“Grit is having the strength and the resilience to overcome your obstacles to reach your goals. To be gritty, you have to care more about succeeding than your possible failures. It forces you to dig deep in your pain and believe you’re going to accomplish your goals.”

Rodney & Ron Lewis, Gritty.

 

Book #3

As I shared earlier, one of my  goals this year is to read 12 books. I am actually on book #3 now. This book, Gritty, is co-written by a friend of mine, Ron Lewis. 

Take the time to find out more about these brothers and their passion the following link. Order the book. By their book and give it to a first year college student. They will thank you for it.

http://www.lewflu.com

Response Ability

On my way into work this morning, I was listening to John Lee Dumas’ podcast, “Entrepreneur on Fire”.  In the episode I listened to (#1482 from November 11, 2016), John was interviewing Rob Moore, author of Disruptive Entrepreneur.  I would highly recommend taking time to listen to EOFire.  Whether you are striving to become an entrepreneur or not, you will learn valuable insights into yourself, your work, and your world.

During an interaction, Rob pointed out that John had emphasized the word “responsibility” as “response ability”.  They had a great exchange following that.  For obvious reasons.

This past Friday, my company held its 3rd annual all-employee education day.  It was a great time to learn, collaborate, and stretch.  But now it’s Monday morning.  What are we all doing with all that information we were exposed to?

Studies show that probably only 5% of us will actually act on new insights we’ve been exposed to. That’s it!  Only 5%!

But dove-tailing off of EOFire this morning, you have the “response ability” to do more with what you learn.

  • You read an article that directly applies to your line of work.  Take time to share it with someone on your team.  Find out if your work should change based upon new ideas you discovered.
  • You read a book about personal growth.  Create an action plan to put what you’ve learned into practice.  Today.
  • You attended a seminar that got you all pumped up.  Journal about what you learned, how you felt, and what you intend to do about this new insight.

In other words, when you learn something new, TAKE ACTION!  That’s your response ability.  As Jeff Olson in The Slight Edge says, take daily, disciplined action toward your goals and you will succeed.

Are you taking responsibility?  Make a plan.  Do the plan.  Don’t let great insight and experience go to waste.

make things happen