What Do You Do in a Coaching Session? by Jim Johnson

My leadership team and I will soon be discussing how we can improve upon our coaching sessions.  In preparation of this, I would like to solicit YOUR feedback.  I would appreciate your responses in the Comment section on the following:

  1. What makes an effective coaching session with a team member?
  2. How often do you coach a team member?  Once a month?  Twice a month?
  3. What is the difference between a team member who has experience vs one who demonstrates expertise?  How does a team member move from experienced to expertise?
  4. How should talk the most in a coaching session – the coach or the team member?

You may respond to any or all of the above.  Just make a note of the question you are answering by typing the corresponding number and then your answer.

Thank you in advance for your participation.  No matter what part of the world you are in or what your occupation is, please share your thoughts!  We can all learn from each other.

when leaders become beter

Coaching with Results

Stay focused on helping your team get the best results:

  • Set clear goals
  • Coach consistently
  • Review progress towards the goals
  • Praise as often as you can
  • Be specific in your counsel if they are missing the mark
  • Touch base in between coaching sessions
  • Document, document, document 

Leading is What’s Possible by Tony Jeary

I’m working my way through Tony Jeary’s book, Life is a Series of Presentations.  If you speak in front of your team, a project team, the executive team, a community organization, etc., this is a must-read for you.  Here’s Tony quoting Scott Klein:

“Leadership…is the ability to teach people and organizations to surpass themselves.  It’s about maximizing human potential and about the ability to see what others don’t see.  Leading is the ability to find where people or an organization should be going, while managing is handling a collection of tasks.”

leadership-is-what-is-possible                                         management-is-what-is-necessary

Pickle Tour – a Lesson in Entrepreneurship

My leadership team and I are going to tour the Sechler pickle factory today.  Sechler’s is located just north of Fort Wayne, Indiana, and they make the best pickles. I’m a huge fan of their Hungarian Red Pepper relish. 

Max Troyer, owner, will be meeting us there today. We’re looking forward to a great time of seeing entrepreneurship and excellence in action.
Here’s a story Fox Business did on Sehler’s:

http://www.foxbusiness.com/features/2014/11/07/0-year-old-pickle-companys-success-story.html

What will we learn from pickle picking leaders today?

To Encourage or Not by Jim Johnson

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We’ve probably all had this kind of manager – the person everyone fears to annoy, anger, or simply encounter.  This manager’s words and actions are harsh, demening at times, and down right nasty. 

What kind of productivity does this sort of person get from his/her team?  Just enough.  Just enough performance from the team to avoid being yelled at, threatened, and targeted. 

A team that produces “just enough” will eventually produce less and less. Team members will come and go and the productivity, as well as the very life of the team, will dwindle.

There is a better way. 

In his book, “Life is a Series of Presenations”, Tony Jeary quotes University of Michigan psychology professor James V. McConnell who said, “People who smile tend to manage, teach and sell more effectively, and to raise happier children.  There’s far more information in a smile than in a frown. That’s why encouragement is a much more effective teaching device than punishment.”

Think of your team right now.  Who needs to take their performance to the next level?  Who has recently demonstrated a behavior that is hurting the team? Who seems to be in a slump?

How you interact with this team member will make all the difference in the world in turning the situation around. 

Smiling and being encouraging isn’t giving them a pass.  As a leader, you want to connect with your team member.  By being abrasive, you are putting up walls.  Communication and understanding is being impeded. 

A positive approach to leading people breaks down walls.  It brings life to your relationships.  Your team will be more open to your guidance and coaching.  Your team will become loyal.  Others will want to join your team. 

Remember this thought from Tony: “The substance of your communication is the response it generates.”