Coaching – what happens to YOU when your team gets better through your coaching by Jim Johnson

If you lead a team, you are coaching (or, at least, I trust that you are).  I just gave a presentation this morning on why coaching is so important for our team members.  I also shared the following on what happens to the COACH when he/she becomes a better:

  1. Your reputation improves in your company.
  2. Your influence expands on your team and in your company.
  3. Your voice/opinion is respected on your team and with your colleagues.
  4. Your future will reveal more opportunities for you.

There is no down side to working hard at becoming a better coach.  Yes, your team members will become better, but YOU have benefits when you commit yourself to becoming a better coach.

Remember:  “You influence from a distance.  You impact up close.”  Dwight Robertson

Commit to impact.  You will create a better world around you.

when leaders become beter

On the Road Again

Tomorrow morning, I fly to Denver where I’ll be giving two presentations at the annual NACCAP (www.naccap.org) conference.  I will be speaking on:

  1. “Right On” – working towards your “next level” opportunity while broadening your influence.
  2. Adding Value – discovering why this is so important and finding practical ways to do it.

I look forward to sharing, learning, and meeting the professionals at NACCAP in Denver!

NACCAP annual conference

What Are You Reading?

Reading is one of the best ways to develop yourself.  Here are the books I’m currently reading:

  • The 15 Invaluable Laws of Growth by John Maxwell
  • In a Pit with a Lion on a Snowy Day by Mark Battersea
  • Awesomely Simple by John Spence 

What are you reading?  

The Facial Expression That Makes You Money by: Kelsey Tamborrino

20130623-073259.jpg

Flash those pearly whites: Small business owners who smile are better able to keep customers coming back, according to new research from Kingston’s Small Business Research Centre.

Pretty simple, right? The problem is that the majority of people don’t do it. The study found that only about half of the 1,216 business people flashed a grin.

That’s bad news considering “smiling is the single most important body language cue to indicate friendliness and safety,” according to Patti Wood, author of Snap: Making the Most of First Impressions, Body Language, and Charisma.

And it can benefit you in an array of other arenas, too. After all, making those around you comfortable is vital to success, says Robert Blackburn, Ph.D., who conducted the study. It’s also a surefire way to become the go-to guy—no one wants to work with a negative Nancy or sign on with a close-minded team.

Use your grin to your advantage: A recent study in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin found that when men made not-so-pleasant comments, people were more likely to lighten up if they flashed a grin than if they didn’t. When you see a smile, you automatically see that person in a positive light. It’s how your brain is wired.

http://news.menshealth.com/the-facial-expression-that-makes-you-money/2013/06/21/

4 Ways to Train Your Brain for Positivity

20130209-215630.jpg

As a manager, your team watches you. Your colleagues watch you. Your boss watches you. Vendors watch you. Your customers, too. They notice whether or not if you are a positive person. Are you? Read on. The following post will give you some practical steps to train yourself to become more positive.

by Jessica Stillman

Not a natural optimist? Use these simple exercises to train your brain to more easily pick out the positive.

You know how when you play Tetris for awhile, even after you stop, you can still see those little falling blocks in your mind’s eye?

The persistence of Tetris isn’t simply an annoying effect of a cleverly designed game, according to scientists. Instead it’s a reflection of something deeply positive about our brains–their plasticity.

That’s a according to a recent post by iDoneThis founder Walter Chen on productivity blog buffer. He cites studies on Tetris (yes, there is such a thing, and yes, this is going somewhere helpful to non-video game addicted entrepreneurs), which found that playing the game for a few hours a week over a period of months, actually changed the brains of players.

“Every time you reactivate a circuit, synaptic efficiency increases, and connections become more durable and easier to reactivate,” Chen writes, before summarizing the importance of the findings: “Whenever you do specific tasks over and over again, they take up less of your brain power over time.”

Learning Positivity

That’s probably not a shock to anyone who has learned to play the piano, speak a foreign language or even hit a tennis ball roughly where you want it to go. So what’s the big deal? This same brain plasticity allows you to master simple skills or sports, also allows you to train yourself to be more positive.

Chen quotes Shawn Achor, the author of The Happiness Advantage who has previously spoken about his work on the brain and happiness to Inc. Just like we can train our brains to more easily recognize the patterns of Tetris, “we can retrain the brain to scan for the good things in life—to help us see more possibility, to feel more energy, and to succeed at higher levels,” Achor says, dubbing this ability “the positive Tetris effect.”

Happiness Homework

So how do you do this? Chen offers four very simple interventions that can, over time, actually rewire your brain to see things more positively:

Scan for the 3 daily positives. At the end of each day, make a list of three specific good things that happened that day and reflect on what caused them to happen. The good things could be anything — bumping into an old friend, a positive remark from someone at work, a pretty sunset. Celebrating small wins also has a proven effect of powering motivation and igniting joy. As you record your good things daily, the better you will get and feel.

Give one shout-out to someone (daily). I love this technique. Take the positive things you’re getting better at recognizing and let people know you’ve noticed. Take a minute to say thanks or recognize someone for their efforts, from friends and family to people at work. A great way to go about this is by sending 1 daily email to someone. It can be your old school teacher, whose advice you are now appreciating every day. A co-worker or someone you’ve only met. Show courage and say thanks.

Do something nice. Acts of kindness boost happiness levels. Something as small and simple as making someone smile works. Pausing to do something thoughtful has the power to get you out of that negativity loop. Do something nice that is small and concrete like buying someone a coffee.

Mind your mind. Mindfulness is paying attention to the present moment without judgment. Opening our awareness beyond the narrowness of negativity can help bring back more balance and positivity into the picture.

http://www.inc.com/jessica-stillman/4-ways-to-train-your-brain-for-positivity.html?goback=.gde_3191399_member_212169873