Six Toxic Beliefs that Successful People Quarantine by Dr. Travis Bradberry

When it comes to self-talk, we’ve discovered six common, yet toxic, beliefs that hold people back more than any others. Be mindful of your tendencies to succumb to these beliefs, so that they don’t derail your career:

Toxic Belief #1: Perfection = Success

Human beings, by our very nature, are fallible. When perfection is your goal, you’re always left with a nagging sense of failure, and end up spending your time lamenting what you failed to accomplish, instead of enjoying what you were able to achieve.

Toxic Belief #2: My Destiny is Predetermined

Far too many people succumb to the highly irrational idea that they are destined to succeed or fail. Make no mistake about it, your destiny is in your own hands, and blaming multiple successes or failures on forces beyond your control is nothing more than a cop out. Sometimes life will deal you difficult cards to play, and others times you’ll be holding aces. Your willingness to give your all in playing any hand you’re holding determines your ultimate success or failure in life.

Toxic Belief #3: I “Always” or “Never” Do That

Follow this link to read the entire article:

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20140929131702-50578967-six-toxic-beliefs-successful-people-quarantine

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Highlights from the Global Leadership Summit Day 1

Here are some of the notes that I took from yesterday’s Global Leadership Summit from the remote location in Fort Wayne, Indiana. #gls17, #fwgls

Bill Hybels, Senior Pastor, Willowcreek

“Incivility and disrespect towards an employee cuts work production by 50%, and the worker takes it out on the customer.”

“Call out the best in your team. They really want this from their leaders.”

“The culture of an organization will only be as healthy as the top leader wants it to be.”

 

sheryl sandbergSheryl Sandburg, COO, Facebook

“To build joy in your life, at the end of every day write down three things that brought you some level of joy. Whether it was some big things or small things. But write them down at the end of each day.”

“If the leader is serious in developing themselves and becoming better, they need to get real, honest feedback.”

marus lemonisMarcus Lemonis, CEO, Camping World and star of the TV show, The Profit

“What is the purpose of business and life? To create a connection. And to create connections, we must be vulnerable and transparent.”

“Take a chance on yourself.”

 

fredrikFredrik Haren, Author

“Companies are not doing enough to foster creativity in their employees.”

“Idea = a Person (Knowledge + Information)”

 

andy stanleyAndy Stanley, Pastor

“When we do something successfully at work, do an autopsy on that success. Understand why we were successful in that venture.”

“What shared assumptions do we have that keeps us stuck?”

 

“If an organization wants to become uniquely better, then they should do the following things:

1. Be a student and not a critic. Do not criticize something you do not understand.

2. Keep your eyes and your mind wide open. Listen to outsiders. They are not bound by your assumptions. Close minded leaders close minds.

3. Replace HOW with WOW! WOW ideas to life. Don’t HOW them to death. We gain nothing by not knowing what our team is dreaming about.

4. Ask uniquely better questions.

  • Is this unique?
  • What would make it unique? Remember, unique attracts attention.
  • Is it better…really better?

Become More Valuable

A few days ago, I shared how to create a great customer experience.  Today, I want to use those same steps to show you how you can become more valuable – to add value – to your team and others in your company.

LISTEN

When a team member or colleague brings you an issue, problem, concern, question…take time to truly listen to what it is they are saying.  Don’t jump to a conclusion or give them a fast answer.  Listen carefully.

ASK

Ask great questions to get to the core issue.  Avoid asking yes/no questions or “why” questions.  Asking great questions will get you to their core issue the fastest.  It also demonstrates that you are actively listening to them.

FEEL

If the person in front of you is frustrated, angry, tense, etc., take the time to empathize with them.  Don’t merely sympathize (“oh, I’m sorry”).  Don’t make light of their situation (“today sucks to be you!”).  Feel what they are feeling and identify with that.

THINK

Once you have the core issue clarified, think.  What resources do you have that can help resolve your team member’s issue?  What resources do you know about that can help?  Who else can you call on for assistance?  Think.

ACT

Once you’ve listened carefully, asked great questions, empathized with the person, and really thought about the best way to help, then (AND ONLY THEN) act.  Far too often people jump into action too quickly.  Act with intention and purpose.

FOLLOW-UP

Following up a couple of days later says that you care about how the resolution is working or not working for the person you helped.  This can be a great learning opportunity for you.  It will create stronger relationships at work as you demonstrate your willingness and ability to invest in someone else.

Make your work interactions better.  Follow this process to add value to your team and your company.

Remember, when you get better, your company gets better.

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Thank You for Visiting!

flags

I am humbled by the leaders from all over the world who visit and read “Go, Leader, Grow!”  Thank you!  

Here is the list of countries where the leaders are from just in the last quarter:

United States Nigeria Qatar United Arab Emirates
India Ghana Egypt Bahamas
Canada Thailand Hong Kong SAR China Angola
Australia Indonesia Saudi Arabia El Salvador
Haiti New Zealand Poland Lebanon
United Kingdom Sri Lanka Costa Rica St. Kitts & Nevis
Singapore European Union Tanzania Chile
China Pakistan Vietnam Jamaica
Philippines Albania Latvia Peru
Cambodia South Africa Switzerland Uganda
Germany Netherlands Italy South Korea
Turkey Moldova Denmark Colombia
Greece Argentina Cape Verde Somalia
Spain France Oman Slovakia
Brazil Mexico Macau SAR China Lesotho
Portugal Sweden Norway Czech Republic
Iraq Ireland Trinidad & Tobago Taiwan
Malaysia Azerbaijan Serbia Hungary
Japan Austria Bangladesh St. Lucia
Romania Kenya Nepal

Intentionally Value Others by Jim Johnson

value others

At the end of May, I had the opportunity to speak at the NACAAP Annual Conference in Denver.  In one of my sessions, I spoke on how leaders can add value to customers, coworkers, and their communities.  Part of what I shared was based upon John Maxwell’s writing.  Here’s a snippet of what I shared…

Remember, our work is not about quotas or reports.  Our work is about PEOPLE.

We tend to focus our work on data, reports, spreadsheets, etc.  When we do this, we miss the most important part of our day – the people around us.

So we need to intentionally value others.  How do we do that?

For me, one of the most effective ways to value others is to intentionally verbalize my appreciation of them and speak potential into them.

I have observed leaders are sometimes hesitant to verbally value their team members.  In fact, years ago I had a boss tell me, “I won’t tell you that you did a good job. Want to know why?  Because if I do that, you won’t try any more.”  This person knew nothing about me or people.  Regardless of your position, we all like to hear “job well done” from time to time.  It does motivate people.

I have been pushing myself to make the time to look a team member in the eyes and tell them “thank you” for their efforts.  I’m working harder at verbally giving them kudos.  I’ve also been intentionally speaking potential into others (i.e. sharing my vision of where I see them growing and ways I will help them get to their goals).

Last week, I gave a leadership book to an emerging leader and challenged them to read it.  I’ve offered that after each section, I would take him to lunch to discuss what he’s been learning.  Intentional.  Purposeful.  Direct.

I’ve had leaders in my life who have done this.  An independent grocery store chain owner did this for me almost 30 years ago.  “As I watch you work, I’m convinced there’s nothing you can’t do if you set you mind to it.”  Those words were (and still are) gold to me.

The founder of an international music organization taught me that anything is possible.  Don’t accept “no” as the final answer – there is always a way to make something happen. These words helped me maneuver through tough situations in Indonesia and in Communist-controlled Estonia (25+ years ago).  I apply this mindset in my life today.

I speak potential into my own son during baseball season.  I’ve seen my own words become reality to him.  I hope he holds on to these words.

There is no down-side in speaking value and potential into another human being.  But we miss out on changing someone’s life when we withhold empowering, encouraging words.

Today, speak value to someone else.  Speak their potential.  It will change them.  It will change your team, your company, your community.

Leaders truly value others – and it is intentional.

 

Do You See Your Team? by Jim Johnson

Do you see your team? Do you see them as people, individuals?  Do you make personal connections with them?

Or do you see them merely as a position or someone to get something done for you?  When we do this, our staff, as human beings, can feel invisible or not valued. 

If we take the time to get to know our teams as individuals who have hopes, dreams, needs, and aspirations, I believe our teams will become better teams. As we work to connect with them on a personal level, our professional connections deepen as well. They will see that you are working to add value to them not only as an employee but as a human being. And when that happens, they will be more dedicated and more willing to buy into our vision.

Years ago I had the honour to be on the USS Nimitz – a nuclear aircraft carrier in San Diego. I had the privilege of meeting Captain Mark Manzier and hear how he interacted with the 5,000 to 6,000 men and women who served with him on that ship.

Every day he would connect with the crew in different ways and in different places. One day he met a young man and asked who he was and where he lived back home. The young man told him and then explained to the captain that his wife had just had their first baby. The captain asked if the baby was a boy or girl and learned the name. 

Later the captain was in a meeting with his commanding officers. And he asked the commanding officer who was over this young man, “What recently happened in the life of this young man can you tell me about it?”  I was told by another officer that in these circumstances, the superior officer had better have a good answer for the captain.

The captain built-in accountability into his lead staff. He found value in his leadership team knowing about the personal things that we’re going on in their crew’s lives. The captain also found value in making that personal connection himself. As the captain explained it, “There will be times when we go into battle and I will call on these men and women to do things that they naturally would not want to do. At that point of decision, they need to know I have their best interest in mind and that they trust me.”

Today, make a personal connection with your team. I’m not asking you to become their best friend. But I’m asking you to personally invest in them. Do you know what their family life is like? Do you know about their kids? Their hobbies?  Their interests?

Be intentional about “seeing” your staff.